Wildlife pictures from Bognor Regis to South Africa are among top nature images of the year

Wildlife pictures from Bognor Regis to South Africa are among top nature images of the year | Daily Mail Online

Two frogs use a leaf as a brolly to shelter from the rain: Amazing wildlife pictures from Bognor Regis to South Africa are among top nature images of the year. The amazing images, taken by both professional and amateur photographers, were the winners and runners-up of a competition by The Society of International Nature and Wildlife Photographers.

Taken from all around the world, from Sussex to South Africa, the photographs capture the stunning forms of wildlife, with close-up shots giving an incredible insight into their life.

Read more… Wildlife pictures from Bognor Regis to South Africa are among top nature images of the year | Daily Mail Online.

Hedge-Fund Manager Makes Millions Moonlighting as Wildlife Photographer

A black-and-white photograph of a charging rhinoceros dominates one wall of David Yarrow’s $230 million hedge-fund firm, Clareville Capital Partners LLP, in London. Unlike the art that hangs in the offices of most highflying hedge funds, however, the image is not the creation of an outside artist but rather of the money manager himself. Yarrow, 48, took the impossibly up-close picture in Kenya last year, and in early September sold a print of the image to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge — aka Prince William and Kate Middleton — who have since had it installed in their Georgian mansion in Norfolk.

Few hedge-fund managers can successfully oversee millions while pursuing a lucrative side career. Yet Yarrow has done just that by reinventing himself as a wildlife photographer, with exhibitions at the Saatchi Gallery and Christie’s in London and a show at New York’s Rotella Gallery in October. Since last autumn, Yarrow has sold more than $1.7 million worth of prints, donating 10 percent of the proceeds to Tusk, a charity that works to halt the trade in ivory and rhino horn in Africa.

See more… Hedge-Fund Manager Makes Millions Moonlighting as Wildlife Photographer  – Bloomberg.

Request for entries: the 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

With just over one month remaining for photographers to enter the 2015 Sony World Photography Awards, the World Photography Organisation reveals a selection of submissions to the 2015 Open competition.

Entries to the Open and Youth competitions of the 2015 Sony World Photography Awards will close on 5 January 2015, followed by the deadline for the Professional competition on 8 January. All competitions are free to enter via http://www.worldphoto.org.

Professional and amateur photographers can compete across 25 categories for cash prizes and Sony digital imaging equipment. One professional photographer will be awarded the title of L’Iris d’Or/Sony World Photography Awards Photographer of the Year at a gala ceremony held in London on 23 April 2015.

More images… 2015 Sony World Photography Awards: Beautiful wildlife and landscape images.

Hoverfly kissing a thistle wins photo competition

Photos of flies, fish, snakes, seabirds, a decapitated butterfly and even a decaying zebra have been recognised in the British Ecological Society’s annual photo competition.

More than 200 entries were received – a new record for the competition – showing scenes of the natural world spanning Africa, Asia, the Americas and Europe.

The winning shot was taken in a back garden in Sweden by Alejandro Ruete, a PhD student at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. He called his photo, which shows a hoverfly perched delicately on a globe thistle, “Kiss in the backyard”.

A shot of an elephant matriarch leading her family to water was highly commended by the judges.

See more… BBC News – Hoverfly kissing a thistle wins photo competition.

Inquisitive polar bears chase wildlife photographer’s boat

David Swindler was on boat near the remote Alaskan city of Kaktovik when polars bears began chasing after his vessel. The 35-year-old said: “On one occasion, some two-year-old cubs were wrestling in the water.”They were going at it for a solid hour.”Finally, they got curious about our boat and started swimming over. “We started to back away, but they swam even faster. “I was taking video with my GoPro camera and they would dive under the water to get a closer look at it. “They even touched it with their nose.” Watch the video… Watch inquisitive polar bears CHASE wildlife photographers boat – Mirror Online.

Stampeding antelopes wins top European wildlife photo.

A photograph of stampeding blesbok antelopes on the plains of South Africa’s Kariega Game Reserve has won best European Wildlife photograph.

The image, called Living Rock Art by Neil Aldridge, aims to “capture the energy and movement of the blesboks in a still frame”.

“I actually hadn’t envisaged that the result would so closely resemble Bushman rock art.”

Mr Aldridge is a contributing photographer to the BBC Wildlife Magazine, Wild Travel Magazine, South Africa’s Go! Magazine and has published a book Underdogs about the endangered African wild dog.

Read more… BBC News – Stampeding antelopes by Neil Aldridge wins top European wildlife photo.

Photographer captures wildlife images

Photographer captures wildlife images

Saturday sunrises almost always find photographer Ronnie Maum on a Red River National Wildlife Refuge trail, anticipating what first light will reveal.

Will it be a flock of roseate spoonbills?

Bobcat kittens clinging to a tree?

Deer ghosting through the shadows?

Maum has taken thousands of wildlife images at the refuge in the past eight years and many are incorporated into the refuge’s on-site signage, website and printed materials. He’s self-published two e-books on the refuge and occasionally sells his photos.

But that’s not why he does it.

“I’m pretty much just a loner guy,” he said. “I’m happy just wandering around by myself taking pictures. You never know what you’re going to see.”

Read more…. Photographer captures wildlife images.

These Were the First Wildlife Photographs Published in National Geographic

Did you know that after National Geographic published its first wildlife photographs in July 1906, two of the National Geographic Society board members “resigned in disgust“? They argued that the reputable magazine was “turning into a ‘picture book’”.

Luckily for us, it did turn out to become quite a picture book. Those first wildlife photos published in the magazine were captured by George Shiras, III, and marked quite a few “firsts.”

Shiras was a lawyer and politician by day — a U.S. Representative from the state of Pennsylvania — and a pioneering photographer by night (literally!). His nighttime photographs of animals represent some of the earliest examples of flash photography.

To achieve his shots, Shiras pioneered a number of different photo-making methods. One was to float silently across water in complete darkness. When he heard rustling nearby, he would point his camera system and snap a flash photograph in that direction.

See more… These Were the First Wildlife Photographs Published in National Geographic.

50 Years of Wildlife Photographer of the Year – in pictures.

50 Years of Wildlife Photographer of the Year – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian

Natural History Museum’s new book released on Wednesday marks five decades of the WPY competition, celebrating the art of wildlife photography. Started in the 1960s, the 160 prize-winning and commended images represent 50 years of different times, styles and specialisms – showcasing some of the iconic images of wildlife on planet Earth, part of an exhibition in London from 24 October.

50 Years of Wildlife Photographer of the Year – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian

See more… 50 Years of Wildlife Photographer of the Year – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian.

Revealed: four Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014 images.

The first award-winning images from this years Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition are released as tickets for the exhibition go on sale.  A programme of special events, including photography masterclasses and portfolio reviews, has also been announced.

Bernardo Cesare captured his image Kaleidoscope in India while examining granulite rock from a working quarry. It depicts a crystal formation from a geological event half a billion years ago.

Young photographer Marc Montes took Snake-eyes while trekking through the forest in the Val d’Aran, Northern Spain.

A lone bat occupies a destroyed German WWII bunker in a remote forest in Poland in Winter hang-out by Łukasz Bożycki.

via Revealed: four Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014 images | Natural History Museum.